Many children naturally outgrow bed-wetting as they get older. If it is genetic, the child is very likely to outgrow it at the same age the parent did. If you talk to your doctor, he is likely to suggest that you wait and see, as bed-wetting is often not very serious. They may also suggest one of a few interventions.


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Therapy – There are a variety of therapies available and if stress is what is causing your child’s bed-wetting, some kind of therapy may be appropriate.  Ask your doctor whether or not therapy may be appropriate and if so, to refer you to an appropriate health professional.



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Moisture Alarms – A moisture alarm is a small battery operated device, commonly found at most drug stores, that can help to teach your child to recognize a full bladder at night.  It is connected to a moisture sensitive pad in your child’s pajamas or bedding and sounds an alarm when it senses wetness.  This should wake your child in time for them to stop the flow of urine and go use the toilet.  This is considered relatively effective and has less chance of relapse or side effects than medications.


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Medications – There are two common types of medication used to treat nighttime incontinence.  Desmopressin boosts levels of anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) to reduce the amount of urine produced at night.  This can be used long term or in the shorter term, for example at a sleep over or camping trip.  Anticholinergic drugs like oxybutynin may help to relax the bladder and increase bladder capacity.  Talk to your doctor about whether this is the right solution for your child, but usually medications are considered a last resort after other lifestyle changes and potential problems have been addressed.